Understanding Fear

Understanding Fear

Written By: Paul DeAngelis

As people get older, they solidify; they’re set in their habits, and aren’t likely to change in major ways. They hurt a lot more, they’ve experiences failures, and they’ve been through the ringer. They know what it’s like out there in the real world, and that a lot of it involves some level of fear.

It’s understandable to have fear; we all do! It’s human. It’s ok to be comfortable, but not all the time. Not if you want to progress and remain healthy in mind and body, as we are meant for constant adaptation. It’s the expectation of fear that makes it so hard for people to alter their habits. People, understandably, have a tendency to prefer all things comfortable. This means that they also expect change to happen in their preferred comfortable circumstances. Unfortunately, this isn’t how it works.

Our bodies and our minds were meant to adapt! It’s part of our biology! This is what I try to keep in mind whenever I develop training programs.

What are the best places to hit during training? Weaknesses. You have to start with the weakest parts of yourself to lay down a solid foundation for improvement. The only problem with this is that it’s an uncomfortable process; people might be embarrassed about their abilities, or want to avoid any kind of discomfort. There’s an element of fear here too; the fear of change, and the fear of feeling exposed. This is almost universally what holds people back.

Think about what movement really is. You establish a balanced position, fall out of it, and then reestablish a new one. That moment of falling is scary for some people! It’s something we’re even warned against as children: “Don’t climb too high, don’t go too fast, you might fall”. But that’s exactly what movement is! Have you ever watched children playing in the yard, or at a playground? They are totally unrestricted, free from the weight of life.

Good training protocols are meant to elicit that spark in your life, the same one you felt when you were experiencing the essence of movement as children, in order to move you forward. The fear doesn’t have to hinder you. Good training involves the understanding of the fear, and understanding that falling is a natural part of the process!